What if this was a blog about building a house?

not our future house (hopefully)Mrs. Foundry and I are on month four of a house-hunt in the Seattle area. I enjoy looking at real-estate, weighing pros/cons of various floor-plans and neighborhoods, figuring out mortgages, etc. However, it’s a time-consuming and sometimes frustrating process. For those not familiar with the parcularities of the Seattle area, we’re experiencing an unprecedented shortage of homes for sale, which is driving up prices and generally making it a less-than-awesome time to look for a house.*

We’re working with an awesome agent, Sheley, who is being patient with us, since we’re being very picky about where we spend a gajillion dollars and park our tuchases for the next few decades.

I recently got turned on to the blog A House By The Park, which details a local dot.com millionaire’s process of buying land and building a very expensive modern home. Even though we have a fraction of his budget, the thoroughness of his writing inspired me to check this option out. In addition, I have a soft spot for modern home architecture, but always assumed it was out of my price range.  Since housing is artificially inflated by low inventory, wouldn’t that make building a home a relatively cost-efficient thing to do?**

And why not blog about it along the way? I figured my blog name is already appropriate: the “foundry” being the home and the “forest” being Seattle. I can write about how we’re challenging the status quo in order to save money, which is pretty much my favorite thing to do and to write about.

So please pardon the mission creep, and indulge me while I write about buying, remodeling, and/or building a home, from identifying the property right up until moving in. Maybe some readers have experience with this already? Either way, I think we’re all in for a wild ride.

* An architect/builder friend explained that banks aren’t lending money for high-density condos, so developers are building lower-density townhomes and single-family homes. The lower density leads to less properties for sale, which leads to the classic supply-and-demand problem that isn’t unique to housing. I’m sure this is a simplified view of the situation, but it’s a more satisfying hypotheses than “nobody wants to sell their house right now.”

** This statement only applies to the house itself. Apparently I’m not the only person in town who came to the conclusion to build, as Vacant lots are also being subjected to the current mini-bubble.

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